Insider vs. Outsider Data Security Threats: What’s the Greater Risk?

47 data security experts compare the risks of insider threats vs. outsider threats.

The risk of insider threats compared to outsider threats is an ongoing debate, though more companies are taking notice of the risks that insiders can pose to the company’s data security today than in the past. Historically, the data breaches that make the news are typically carried out by outsiders. While these breaches can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars (often millions more), outsider threats are generally the threats that have been addressed with traditional security measures. It’s the threats that originate from inside that are much more difficult to prevent and detect using one-size-fits-all security measures.

Insider threats cyber security

Just one of the reasons that insider threats are more difficult to prevent stems from the fact that insiders don’t always threaten the company’s data security intentionally. In fact, many data breaches resulting from insider threats are completely unintentional. To combat these risks, as well as the insider threats originating from those who do have malicious intent, a holistic approach to security is essential in the modern threat landscape – one that adequately addresses not only insider and outsider threats, but effectively manages both unintentional and intentional threats posed by those within your organization.

To gain more insight into the threats posed by insiders vs. outsiders and how companies can effectively mitigate these risks, we asked a panel of data security pros to answer this question:

“What’s more of a threat to a company’s data security: insiders or outsiders?”

Find out what our experts had to say below.

Full article here via Digital Guardian: https://digitalguardian.com/blog/insider-outsider-data-security-threats

Meet the experts:   Spencer Coursen   @spencercoursen

Security Expert Spencer Coursen on ABC7 News
Spencer Coursen ABC7 New York News

Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security advisor, threat assessment consultant, and protective intelligence strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. His systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.

“According to a recent report, 58% of all security incidents can be attributed to…”

Insider threats. The most significant obstacle for a company to overcome is employee complacency. In most corporate environments, upwards of 80% of employees are unable to articulate any real understanding of IT-security related issues and are most likely to introduce a virus through an NSFW download, accept malware through a phishing exploit, introduce a corrupted mobile device (BYOD) to the corporate network, or engage in some sort ofinadvertent human error which may result in a threat to data security (not updating security settings, using simple passwords, doing secure work on public wifi, etc.).

Outside actors take full advantage of these insiders’ vulnerabilities. This is exactly what happened with the Target data breach. In this example, the hackers stole the username and password of an authorized vendor. This gave them unlimited access the Target network without triggering any alarms or raising any suspicion.

Hackers are no longer breaking in through back doors which may trigger alarms. Today they are stealing the keys of authorized users and walking right through the front door.

 

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Spencer Coursen is a nationally recognized threat management expert who has an exceptional record of success in the assessment, management, and resolution of threats, domestic and global security operations, investigations, policy authorship, and protective strategy.

Spencer Coursen | Threat Management Expert | Washington, DC

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British politician Jo Cox dies after being attacked at public meeting

British politician Jo Cox dies after being attacked at public meeting

“Cox was attacked outside the Birstall library after holding a regular public meeting with constituents, said Robert Light, a Conservative councilor from nearby Birkenshaw.” via CNN

British politician Jo Cox dies after being attacked at public meeting

While most executives, politicians, and public figures are able to go about their daily lives without a protective detail following their every move, their lives do become become inherently more complicated whenever they agree to a planned public appearance.

Regardless of circumstance or scenario, whenever the general public has a reasonable expectation of a time and place public figure can be found, protective considerations should always be employed as preventative measure.

It is important to understand why these events have an increased level of risk. Unlike an off-the-record, or impromptu appearance (think President Obama making a pit-stop at Shake Shack) where the likelihood of an attack would be considered “Low” — events that are publicized in advance give a would-be-attacker critical information like dates and location, and most concerning, time to plan.

The chances of something happening? A statistically low percentage. But if it happens…it’s 100%

For the violent offender, the single most significant factor in targeting an individual for attack is likelihood of success. Without a high-likelihood of success, a would-be-attacker will transfer their efforts to someone who is more exposed and easier to approach. Eliminating those small windows of exposure when approachability is most likely to occur by unknown and un-vetted persons is of critical importance.

Securing transportation, leaving airports, checking into hotels, arriving/departing events, and partaking in public engagements all present variables of uncertainty that can be drastically minimized with effective planning and logistical coordination.

Awareness + Preparation = Safety


Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security consultant, threat assessment advisor, and protective strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. His systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.

www.SpencerCoursen.com

Security Expert Spencer Coursen specializes in threat assessment protective intelligence and vulnerability reduction. Coursen Security Group Logo.

Security experts discuss the shooting on UCLA campus

Spencer Coursen discuss the shooting on UCLA campus

“We can no longer afford to live in a world where we simply hope that nothing will happen, and then solely rely on the first responders to save us once something does.” ~Spencer Coursen, President Coursen Security Group

 

Spencer Coursen discuss the shooting on UCLA campus

via instagram.com/coursensecurity

 

www.SpencerCoursen.com

Security Expert Spencer Coursen specializes in threat assessment protective intelligence and vulnerability reduction. Coursen Security Group Logo.

 

Credit Union Security: 4 Ways to Beat the Bad Guys

Spencer Coursen of Coursen Security Group provides expert commentary to credit unions looking to beat the bad guys.

Matthew Yussman, CFO for the $122 million Achieve Financial Credit Union who also doubles as the Berlin, Conn.-based cooperative’s security training officer, was a victim of an unusual criminal plot that he never saw coming.

Last February, Brian Scott Witham and Michael Anthony Benanti took Yussman hostage, duct taped a bomb to his chest and forced him into a failed attempt to rob his own credit union. They targeted Yussman, as well as two other credit union employees and their families, via social media sites and used portable cameras to case their victims.

Although executives and employees who work in the financial services industry may be at a higher risk of becoming targets of criminals, security experts say credit union employees can take steps to protect themselves and reduce their risk of becoming the next victim. Security experts also shared what employees can do to survive a hostage situation.

1. Don’t be a soft target.

A soft target is someone who is distracted or not paying attention to their surroundings, even in their own neighborhood.

In Yussman’s case, for example, he parked his car in his driveway and unloaded some stuff to place in the garage. While he was doing that, he was rushed by Benanti and Witham.

Yussman acknowledged that if he had driven his car into his garage and closed the garage door, he may have been able to prevent the incident from happening.

Randy Spivey, CEO and founder of the Center for Personal Protection and Safety in Reston, Va., said his company will watch executives and their daily habits to determine if they are soft or hard targets and make recommendations.

“A hard target is going to be somebody that is not paranoid but they’re not oblivious,” he said. “When they’re walking around town or they’re coming out of their house at night, they are aware of their surroundings.”

distracted-walking

 

2. Take simple security steps.

Spencer Coursen, president/CEO of the Coursen Security Group in New York City, said even the most basic safety and personal security precautions can significantly reduce an employee’s vulnerability.

“Something as simple as modifying your daily movement, taking alternate routes to and from work, school or the gym, or even every so often driving around your block before pulling into your driveway sends a clear message to anyone taking notice that your actions are not overly predictable,” Coursen said.

If you suspect someone is casing your home, call the police, Spivey said.

Spivey also recommended that in addition to a home security alarm system, you should consider installing security cameras around your home. For a couple of hundred dollars you can invest in a basic camera system that can make your home a hard enough target for criminals to avoid, he said.

home-surveillance-camera

 

3. Ask yourself, “Is somebody following me?”

If you believe someone is following you, Spivey recommended that you don’t confront the person.

Instead, stop and look in the general direction of that person from a safe distance of about 20 or 30 yards away.

“I’ve seen people who sense that somebody is following them and they look at them and pretend that they’re dialing their phone as if they are reporting it to somebody, which can be a deterrent,” he said. “That makes you a hard target versus a soft target.”

Keep an eye out for safe havens such as police and fire stations. Restaurants, hotel lobbies, public libraries, community centers and hospitals can also be safe places where you can get help.

4. Restrict your social media information.

It’s also important to limit the information you post about yourself onsocial media sites.

“We’ll see individuals that sometimes will have two different profiles. They may have one that’s open to the public and the information that’s on there is very generic and very controlled,” Spivey explained. “Executives also may have very private social media sites that they use only for very close friends and family members.”

Spivey said executives need to understand that if they post information on social media, criminals may be able to use it as an opportunity to commit a crime.

“Think about your teenage daughter and what information you’d want and wouldn’t want her to put on social media,” he said. “Think about all the guys who might be looking at that information and how you’d want to control that.”

In addition to changing your passwords every quarter; updating software, security and privacy settings; and never opening unsolicited links or connecting with someone you don’t know, Coursen said it may be a good idea to protect your online browsing habits from being tracked or monitored.

Coursen said software exists to assist with this effort, including free options that provide access to a network of anonymous proxy servers. It was originally intended to help journalists, spies and students who live in regions of online censorship, he said.

It’s also very important to regularly run virus scans on your computer and update the security features on your wireless router at home.

5. Surviving a Hostage Situation

To survive a hostage situation, it’s important to remember the three C’s: Calm, connect and capitalize.

“The first C is that you want to be a calm influence, because it’s going to be a very nerve wrecking experience,” Spivey said. “The reality is that most hostages survive.”

What Spivey means by connect is to help the criminals see you as person, not as an object.

“You don’t want them seeing as you as the CFO of a credit union. You want them to see you as a dad, a husband, a brother, something that connects you as a person,” he said. “The reason is, it’s easier to kill an object than a person. You want to engage them in a way that makes you seem like a likable person. You don’t want to be rude. You don’t want to be arrogant.”

And then capitalize, which means to encourage the criminals to a peaceful solution that is going to meet whatever they want.

“If they want money, then you may say, ‘OK, well, let’s see what we can do to help that,’ Spivey explained. “Whatever you do, you don’t want to argue with them. You want to be a calming influence as best as you possibly can to encourage a peaceful resolution.”

Although it is risky, the opportunity to escape from a hostage situation may be another option depending on the circumstances.

“The best opportunity for escape may occur in the first moments of a kidnapping,” Coursen said. “Kidnappers will sometimes let down their guard momentarily or do something that can afford the victim the opportunity to escape. The kidnapper may not have considered that a victim may react by fleeing or taking a chance. If circumstances permit, try to get away.”

 

This article by Peter Strozniak originally appeared here: http://www.cutimes.com/2016/03/14/credit-union-security-4-ways-to-beat-the-bad-guys

www.SpencerCoursen.com

Security Expert Spencer Coursen specializes in threat assessment protective intelligence and vulnerability reduction. Coursen Security Group Logo.

 

Safe Havens: Have a plan, Know where to go, Know how to get there

Spencer Coursen of Coursen Security Group discusses The 3 F’s of “Family, Food and Flags” are good reminders for where children can go to get help

A Safe Haven is nothing more than a place you can go to be protected.

For most of us, the best Safe Haven will be our homes…but what about those times when home is too far away?

When moments matter most, you want to have a plan, you want to know where to go, and know how to get there.

Anywhere you can go to be safe will serve your purpose. So take a few minutes of your day today to identify those places between home and work or home and school where you know you could go in an emergency.

The same things goes for your children.

No one fears that which they know well. From turning of all the lights at night to jumping from the diving board in the backyard pool, children are at their best when they are empowered to overcome that which frightens them. In that spirit, the following are three simple solutions for parents looking to empower their children with a simple personal safety strategy.

When in doubt: “Run to a Restaurant.”

Restaurants make great safe havens!

  • They are easy to describe
  • They are easy to identify
  • They can accommodate large groups of people
  • They will have food, water, and bathrooms
  • They are staffed by locals who know the area
  • And they will have hard lined phone an internet so you can still let your loved ones know you’re ok even if the cell towers go down

Make identifying safe havens a regular part of your family emergency plan so that everyone knows where to go and everyone knows where to be found if your family should get separated.

Identifying Safe Havens is a lot like wearing your seatbelt; most of the time you won’t need it — but in those unexpected times you do — you’ll certainly be glad you did.

www.SpencerCoursen.com

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Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security consultant, threat assessment advisor, and protective strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. His systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.

Security Expert Spencer Coursen on ABC7 News
Spencer Coursen ABC7 New York News

Spencer Coursen – Advisor | Consultant | Strategist | Veteran

Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security consultant, threat assessment advisor, and protective strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. Spencer Coursen’s systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.  via  www.SpencerCoursen.com 

Security Consultant Spencer Coursen in New York City
Spencer Coursen in NYC
Security Consultant Spencer Coursen
Spencer Coursen
Spencer Coursen | Afghanistan
Spencer Coursen – Afghanistan / Pakistan border
Spencer Coursen Zero Dark Thirty
Spencer Coursen featured in a unit still photography of Zero Dark Thirty, Directed by Kathryn Bigelow. DP Greig Fraser. Photography by Jonathan Olley 2012.

 

Spencer Coursen in Amman, Jordan
Spencer Coursen in Amman, Jordan

 

 

“Soft Target” Safety: Protecting Your Business From Targeted Attack

Security Expert Spencer Coursen of Coursen Security Group discusses how soft targets can help protect themselves from being targeted.

Renewed concerns for “soft-target” safety dominate the news cycle today after terrorist took hostages at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Mali.

This tragic news comes as Paris is still processing the deadly attacks in the city of lights, and one can’t help but be reminded of similar attacks on a popular hotel in Somalia that left more than 14 people dead and dozens more injured, or the attack at the Bardo Museum in Tunisia that left 21 dead.

The argument will always be made that we can’t protect everything all of the time.  If that statement is true, than the converse must also be true: They can’t attack everything all the time. What we must understand is that for the violent offender, their act of violence is of greater significance than the target of their action. This makes ‘likelihood of success’ the single most influential factor of target selection.  We can no longer afford to live in a world where they simply hope that nothing will happen, and then solely rely on the first responders to save the day once something does. Our focus needs to shift from being reactive to proactive. To do our best to prevent these tragic outcomes from ever becoming a reality in the first place.

VulnerabilityReduction.CSG.001

What we CAN do is lower the likelihood of being targeted.  We CAN ensure that the policies and procedures we have written down as doctrine are the same as what are being put into practice.  We CAN raise our level of awareness to the vulnerabilities which surround us, and then bring those concerns to the decision makers so that those issues may be effectively addressed. We CAN prepare today for a safer tomorrow.

 

Take An Honest Look At Your Current Protective Measures

Most business leaders are aware of the risk associated with bringing their services into the marketplace, but what about those concerns inherent to their actual place of business? However unlikely it may be for a business to be directly targeted, the reality is that too few businesses have taken any proactive measures to effectively reduce their vulnerability.  Today’s owners have a responsibility to understand the limitations of antiquated and reactive security measures and learn as much as they can about more proactive practices that today’s operating environment requires. The modern marketplace offers a host of consultative and technological advantages to help ensure the safety of all involved.

 

Promote A Positive, Personal Interaction

Greeters, information providers, security guards, or a host who simply says hello to every person who comes near your venue is an effective yet non-invasive approach to promoting a positive protective posture. The everyday human interaction resulting in an unshared concern is arguably the greatest untapped source of protective intelligence available to any business of any size.  The psychological deterrence of a simple inter-personal communication carries much more weight than the thought of “being watched.”  Human interaction offers an immediate notification of potential harm. If a personal interaction triggers something suspicious, immediate attention can be called to the situation. This human approach is a much more practical application than sole reliance on  someone in a command center noticing something suspicious.

 

Access Control

Access Control saves lives. A venue’s ability to pre-determine where an initiation of violence must first take place allows for a venue’s protective resources to be allocated where they will be most effective – at the point of entry! 

It is perfectly possible for a place of business to have an open and welcoming environment, but there is no need whatsoever to give all who enter free-reign throughout the entire facility. Banks do this well. While the lobby is relatively “open” to the public, few have access to get behind the teller desks, and even fewer have access to the vault.

 

Keys, Doors, and Locks

Keeping people out is easier than getting them out. Effectively controlling who’s allowed through your front door is especially important if once someone is allowed inside there is nothing preventing them from having free-reign throughout the rest of your establishment.

The problem with keys is that they work all the time. Keys are cheap, frequently lost, and easy to copy. Keys don’t validate their user the way card readers and key-codes do. Consider dual-authentication options to limit and monitor access.

 

Social Media Awareness

Geofeedia  has perfected a method for providing real-time, location-based, social media intelligence to small business owners, hotel managers, restaurateurs, and security teams that helps to promote a better understanding of the social postings inherent to their specific location.  This kind of real-time intelligence can be invaluable in helping a business to ensure that your customer needs and concerns are being effectively addressed.

 

Safe Haven

A safe haven is nothing more than a place you know you can go to be safe. Everyone knows if there is a fire to evacuate the building. What most people don’t know is where to go next. In an emergency, it’s always best to go from unsafe to safe. The parking lot fifty feet from the building may be a safe distance from a fire in the break room, but it is not a universal safety precaution from other threats that are just as likely to occur. During an active shooter event, hiding under your desk or behind an office door likely won’t do much good either (bullets travel through doors and walls.)

If you have the physical ability to run…RUN. A moving target – especially one gaining distance with each step  —  is hard to hit. Take some time to talk with your staff about where you can all go for accountability, continuity, and safety should you ever have to leave the office in a hurry. Even if it’s just to the Starbucks down the street, make sure everyone knows where to go and knows how to get there. Identifying safe havens is a lot like wearing your seatbelt: Often just a precaution, but invaluable when needed.

Read: Bomb Threats: How safe is your evacuation plan?

Protective Intelligence

Protective Intelligence is the process for collecting and assessing information about persons who have interest, motivation, intention and practical capability to do harm. When it comes to identifying and assessing those events that are most likely to be a concern, information is invaluable:

  • The creepy, curly haired guy you noticed going through the work trash out back, write it down;
  • The flower delivery guy who for-whatever-reason made the hair on your neck stand-up, write it down;
  • See the obsessive gym guy who won’t take no for an answer driving by your office, write it down.

Someone may not see everything, but everything is seen by someone. The smallest things can be huge indicators when viewed through the prism of space and time. If you see something, say something, because chances are that others saw something too. Even if you talk about it with your coworkers in the break room, writing it down while it’s still fresh in your mind will not only serve as confirmation of what you saw, but will provide a time/date stamp to compare against similar reports.

Those wishing to act with violent intent must engage in some aspect of research and planning that makes their behaviors observable to the general public. Trespassing, surveillance, and attempting to breach security are all pre-incident indicators of violence.

Start a simple email address at work that can be universally used by all, like “concern@BusinessName.com” The more puzzle pieces you provide, the more likely a potential hazard can be managed toward peaceful resolve. After access control, an effective protective intelligence and threat assessment program is the next most important precaution for reducing risk and preventing violence.

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Conclusion

Everyday vigilance is a small price to pay for the liberties and the freedoms which flow so freely from peace, but the burden is ours to bare. Safety is a communal responsibility, and there is still so much more we can do to help ensure the certainty of future safety.

Taking a few moments to put a plan in place is sometimes all that is needed to prepare today for a safer tomorrow.

Awareness + Preparation = Safety


Spencer Coursen is a nationally recognized threat management expert who has an exceptional record of success in the assessment, management, and resolution of threats, domestic and global security operations, investigations, policy authorship, and protective strategy.

Spencer Coursen | Threat Management Expert

School Safety Made Simple

Teacher Intelligence -- Human Intelligence with a Teacher's Touch. Security expert Spencer Coursen of Coursen Security Group has developed an anonymous reporting application that improves administrator awareness of evolving concerns within an a school's ecosystem.

 

 

www.TeacherIntelligence.com

Awareness + Preparation = Safety

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Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security advisor, threat assessment consultant, and protective strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. His systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.

www.spencercoursen.com 

www.CoursenSecurityGroup.com

Info@CoursenSecurityGroup.com

 @SpencerCoursen / @CoursenSecurity

https://www.linkedin.com/in/spencercoursen

TeachInt: Human Intelligence With A Teacher’s Touch

Teacher Intelligence -- Human Intelligence with a Teacher's Touch. Security expert Spencer Coursen of Coursen Security Group has developed an anonymous application that improves administrator awareness of evolving concerns within an a school's ecosystem.

For far too long long, the safety of our nation’s schools have fallen victim to a vicious cycle of debate between the desires of partisan politics and the reality of budgetary constraints.

In the end nothing changes, and we are forced to fall back to the antiquated methodologies of reacting to these concerns, rather than preventing them from ever happening in the first place.

The cycle of concern that plagues the hearts and minds of parents everywhere must come to an end.

We can no longer afford to send our children off to school simply hoping that nothing will happen and then solely relying on the first responders to save our loved ones once something does. 

 “In today’s schools, there is all too often an emphasis placed on analyzing a specific act within the context of an isolated incident, rather than taking the ‘totality of circumstance’ into consideration before rendering an assessment. This program removes the complications of the reporting process and facilitates awareness through an anonymous, simple, yet effective application. Our goal is to to help ensure the emotional and physical well-being for all involved by empowering the individual observer to have a positive impact on future safety.”  ~Spencer Coursen

Awareness + Preparation = Safety

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Spencer Coursen is a nationally recognized threat management expert who has an exceptional record of success in the assessment, management, and resolution of threats, domestic and global security operations, investigations, policy authorship, and protective strategy.

Spencer Coursen | Threat Management Expert

Spencer Coursen | Threat Management Expert | Washington, DC

 

The Masked Motivators Of Mayhem

In the ever-evolving realm of crime and punishment, some things still remain constant. From stalking and harassment to insider threats, and from active-shooter incidents to high-stake heists all initial incentives can still be categorized into the three main motivators of mayhem:

Need, Profit, and Revenge.

NEED: Needs are a motivating force that compel an act toward satisfaction. Beyond food and sleep, they are found in the physical need of the addict who steals in support of a habit all the way through to the emotional needs of the love-sick stalker in need of reciprocation.

PROFIT:  Money has always been a manipulator of moral flexibility. There is no shortage of enticing offers where hard-to-acquire collectables, corporate insights, and state secrets can be easily sold for cash. This however, does not discount the motivation for profit that can be easily obtained through a breach of contract. The betrayal of confidentiality in support of TV, movie, or book deals has proven time and again to be a lucrative and not-entirely-punishable venture. The 24hr news cycle demands new, sexy, and sensationalized stories each and every day, and the producers of these programs not only pay very well, but seal the deal with promises stemmed from the additional faculties of fame.

REVENGE: Revenge is of course the most concerning of the three motivators, because much like loyalty, one never knows where the ideation of revenge is born. The jaded ex-lover, the passed-over-for-promotion employee,  and the religious crusader all have separate but equal investment in their willingness to exact some measure of revenge. They all want justice for whatever real or imagined grievance they feel they experienced, and they all invest in the ideation than they have within themselves the ability to bring about righteous resolve.

Protective Intelligence is the process for collecting and assessing information about persons who have interest, motivation, intention and practical capability to do harm. A person doesn’t just snap anymore than a pot of water just boils over. They are both the result of a slow burn; a motive-fueled ideation finally reaching a tipping point that compels them to act. To combat these aggressions, we must realize that regardless of circumstance or scenario, all motivations of mayhem have all followed the same simple pathway from grievance to action: Grievance, Ideation, Research and Planning, Preparation, Breach, and Attack.

The crippling infrastructure of our society is not limited to our bridges and highways. Our protective systems and strategies are crumbling as well. Many of the the antiquated security measures in place today are designed to doing nothing more than passively wait for the sirens to announce an intrusion. The strategies in place to respond to those alarms are rooted in effective response rather than proactive prevention. The problem of course is that today’s attackers aren’t wearing black ski masks and breaking-in through back windows. Instead, they have found it much more effective to simply walk through the front door.

Even within the realm of cyber crime, the reality is that those with nefarious intent are much more likely to steal keys than they are to pick the locks. It’s much easier to steal a username and password and then exploit the inherent privileges of a legitimate user. Much like a modern day “Manchurian Candidate”  they are turning innocent users into insider threats. 

Workplace violence and school shooters are no different. These violent acts aren’t being conducted by outside actors. They are the direct result of insider threats. Why? Because the single most influential factor of target selection is likelihood of success. These actors already know the layout of their target. They have likely participated in the response drills to the very acts they plan to carry out. Perhaps most disturbing is that they have the ability to breach and enter their target without raising so much as an eyebrow until their initiation of violence erupts.

Security expert Spencer Coursen uses pieces of a jigsaw puzzle to explain

“In today’s schools and corporations, there is all too often an emphasis placed on analyzing a specific act within the context of an isolated incident, rather than taking the “totality of circumstance” into consideration before rendering an assessment.” ~Spencer Coursen 

Imagine a jigsaw puzzle who’s pieces had been thrown to the wind. Someone is bound to stumble across an individual piece. And while they may find that unique piece interesting, it’s easy to see how it may not be viewed as altogether significant.  

However, if that individual piece was then matched up with other pieces of the puzzle — piece by piece — the bigger picture would begin to take shape.  Protective intelligence is no different. It’s the little pieces coming together that helps the hazard on the horizon to be more clearly seen. The more pieces collected, the more effective those protective strategies become.

Awareness, threat assessment, and protective intelligence are three separate but equally important components of public, structural, and personal safety.  We can no longer afford to live in a world where we simply hope that nothing will happen, and then solely rely on the first responders to save us when something does. Today’s safety requires a communal concern; an everyday responsibility toward vigilance we all must accept. A keen eye open for the motivators of mayhem is an effective first step toward preparing today for a safer tomorrow.

Awareness + Preparation = Safety

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Spencer Coursen is the President of Coursen Security Group. He is an expert security consultant, threat assessment advisor, and protective strategist who is dedicated to reducing risk and preventing violence. His systems and strategies help corporations, non-profit organizations, schools, and at-risk public figures ensure the certainty of safety for all involved.

www.CoursenSecurityGroup.com

www.SpencerCoursen.com

Info@CoursenSecurityGroup.com

@SpencerCoursen / @CoursenSecurity

https://www.facebook.com/Coursen.CSG